Connecting Educators and Students to Outdoor School

Fostering Creativity and Ingenuity in Outdoor Classrooms

Kirsten Haugen croppedKirsten Haugen, Nature Explore
Saturday, September 29, 9:15-10:45am

Both children and adults learn not only by being told but through first-hand and interactive experiences and reflection. In this highly interactive outdoor session using participant narratives and photographs from outdoor classroom documentation, we’ll move, explore, discuss and put our minds to work to consider in detail the qualities of time, space, resources and relationships that foster creativity and ingenuity in outdoor classrooms. Taking into account the qualities of these four dimensions provides a provocative way to think about outdoor education and may help participants move from a more didactic approach. We’ll compare our findings to recent research on the topic from Nature Explore and The Outdoor Classroom Project. After this session, you’ll be prepared to think more critically about how you offer effective outdoor educational experiences with young children.

Kirsten Haugen. As a writer, workshop leader and educational consultant, Kirsten Haugen works nationally and internationally with children and adults to explore and create innovative educational opportunities related to connecting children with nature, universal design for learning, inclusive education, and indoor and outdoor classroom design. She currently works primarily with natureexplore.org and worldforumfoundation.org, as well as a volunteer and board member for nearbynature.org, and grant writer and volunteer for cielodeamor.org. Learn more at: www.kirstenhaugen.org


Outdoor School for All! Diverse Programming and Impacts in Oregon

Steven Braun croppedSpirit Brooks cropped

Steven Braun, Oregon Environmental Literacy Program
Spirit Brooks, Oregon State University Extension
Saturday, September 29, 11:00am-12:00noon

Oregon’s legislative charge, providing Outdoor School for All has begun! Every fifth or sixth student in Oregon will ultimately attend - seventy-five percent attended in 2017/8. Who is missing and why? How does outdoor school vary statewide? What are the common outcomes across diverse programs serving diverse audiences?

Steven Braun Dr. Braun is an environmental science and education consultant. He earned his Ph.D. in Earth, Environment and Society from Portland State University in 2015, studying educational and ecological impacts of Environmental Service-Learning; he holds a Master’s degree in Special Education. His research and leadership activities include directing the Lane County STEM Hub and serving on the Oregon Environmental Literacy Program Council where he leads a team investigating outcomes of outdoor school. He has authored publications in Environmental Education Research, the Green Teacher and in the book Teaching About Invasive Species. He has taught as a certified teacher in four states and led professional learning activities for in-service and pre-service educators in STEM, Environmental Education, Service-Learning and Inquiry.

Spirit Brooks Dr. Brooks is the Research, Evaluation, and Assessment Coordinator for Outdoor School/OSU Extension. She earned her PhD from the University of Oregon in Critical Sociocultural Studies in Education in 2017, studying teaching practices in college access programs that catered to under-served students in elementary, middle, and high school; and she holds a Master’s degree in Women and Gender Studies and Anthropology. Past research includes leading a study of Native women leaders in the Environmental Justice movement, research and development of best practices in implementing Native Studies curriculum in K-12 schools, and collaborative research ethics, particularly decolonizing research practices. Dr. Brooks has authored peer-reviewed publications in the Journal of Family and Diversity in Education, the Qualitative Report, the High School Journal, Gender and Education, and the International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education. Dr. Brooks is also affiliated faculty in the College of Education at Oregon State University, teaching Ethnographic Methods, and has taught Educational Foundations and the Cultural Context of Schooling in the College of Education at the University of Oregon.


Outdoor School Field Study Activities in Rotation: Sample what is offered to students here at Canby Grove

Jennifer Basham croppedAndrea Hussey croppedJennifer Basham and Andrea Hussey,  Multnomah Education Service District
Saturday, September 29, 1:45-3:15pm

During every full day at Multnomah Education Service District (MESD) Outdoor School at Canby Grove, there are five to six hours of time dedicated to place-based, hands-on science learning. During Field Study, 6 th graders have the opportunity to learn about the natural places they live in or near. Through a series of lessons that incorporate science, art, writing, math and engineering, the students get the chance to explore, hypothesize, make observations, record findings, ask questions and conduct tests. Through field science, students can gain an understanding of how natural systems work and the relevance of local places to their lives. 

In this segment, we will be introducing participants to a selection of MESD Field Study activities. This will include a Field Study tour along with some of our High School Student Leaders who will guide you through the activities and a Q & A at the end.

Jennifer Basham, a native Oregonian and a product of Outdoor School, brings over 13 years of experience working with all ages of children in both residential and classroom settings. Jennifer has taught 4th and 5 th grades, served as a site supervisor at outdoor school programs for NWRESD and MESD, and has served in supervisory positions for summer camps throughout Portland.  Jennifer holds an Oregon State Teaching License and her Master’s of Science in Educational Leadership and Policy from Portland State University as well as an Oregon Administrators License.

Andrea Hussey was bread and buttered in Portland Oregon. She attended Howard Outdoor School as a 6th grader and loved it.  She returned as a student Leader and Animals Field Instructor at Collins and became a Site Supervisor in 2003. Andrea has been the Site Supervisor of the Arrah Wanna, Howard, and Angelos sites. Andrea holds a degree from the University of Oregon in Environmental Studies and Womens' Studies, and she worked in the reproductive justice movement as a patient advocate and helped to start a non-profit hotline for women.


Outdoor School: The Value of High School Leader Participation

Jennifer Basham croppedAndrea Hussey croppedJennifer Basham and Andrea Hussey, Multnomah Education Service District
Saturday, September 29, 3:30-4:30pm

Multnomah Education Service District (MESD) Outdoor School has been utilizing the help of high school volunteers since 1966.  Over the 52 years of the program, there have been approximately 70,000+ high school students that have volunteered as Student Leaders. Their primary roles are to assist program staff in supervision, science instruction and to be helpers in the overall day-to-day experience for younger students. The vast majority of our Student Leaders participated in the program as 6th grade students and are returning to be volunteers because of their 6th grade experience. Having a High School Student Leader(ship) component is a unique model and presents some incredible opportunities for building skills and leadership over time.
 
In this segment, we will present an overall view of the recruitment and leadership program, its challenges and opportunities, as well as the positive effects it has on the overall program.

Jennifer Basham, a native Oregonian and a product of Outdoor School, brings over 13 years of experience working with all ages of children in both residential and classroom settings. Jennifer has taught 4th and 5 th grades, served as a site supervisor at outdoor school programs for NWRESD and MESD, and has served in supervisory positions for summer camps throughout Portland.  Jennifer holds an Oregon State Teaching License and her Master’s of Science in Educational Leadership and Policy from Portland State University as well as an Oregon
Administrators License.

Andrea Hussey was bread and buttered in Portland Oregon. She attended Howard Outdoor School as a 6th grader and loved it.  She returned as a student Leader and Animals Field Instructor at Collins and became a Site Supervisor in 2003. Andrea has been the Site Supervisor of the Arrah Wanna, Howard, and Angelos sites. Andrea holds a degree from the University of Oregon in Environmental Studies and Womens' Studies, and she worked in the reproductive justice movement as a patient advocate and helped to start a non-profit hotline for women.


Stewardship Based Ocean Education & Talking Trash

Lisa Habecker croppedPooka Rice croppedLisa Habecker, Haystack Rock Awareness Program
Pooka Rice, Haystack Rock Awareness Program
Sunday, September 30th, 10:30am - 12noon

Haystack Rock Awareness Program Staff, having educated countless numbers of visitors and students over the past 32 years at Haystack Rock, will discuss our unique brand of stewardship-based ocean education; focusing on hands-on experience in conjunction with citizen science and art. During our presentation, participants will have the opportunity to touch and examine shells, bird parts, and other exciting bits of our marine collection from the Rock. Participants will learn about our inclusive, outdoor education model, how we run our and coordinate our field-trips and will additionally have the opportunity to participate in a marine-debris art activity which can be taken back as a fun and informative classroom or outdoor education activity. This hands-on activity includes sifting sand to discover microplastics, while discussing how microplastics (aka, trash) impact our ocean and terrestrial ecosystems, then encapsulating said microplastics into a glass “keepsake jar” which can be worn as a necklace or fashioned into a keychain. The goal of the activity is to raise awareness about plastic ocean pollution and continue the dialog into every day conversation.

Lisa Habecker, having grown up in in Sacramento, California, and wildly inspired by marine biodiversity, has been educating students, visitors, staff and volunteers at the Rock for the past 16 years. Nicknamed, the “nudibranch Queen” for her love of the intertidal invertebrates, her knowledge, advocacy of, and passion for the ocean and marine ecosystems are only surpassed by her love of her family and thoughtfulness as an educator.

Pooka Rice has a widely dynamic background, with her main inspirations in life found in art, the ocean and education. Having worked all over the country in a variety of disciplines, she has felt most at home working with art as a medium to educate and inspire. As a technical writer, she has put her skills to excellent use, writing grants and raising funds to grow local art and education programs, like HRAP.

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